Crimson Peak

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Last week I went to a press screening of Crimson Peak, Guillermo del Toro’s latest that he always calls “not a horror story but a Gothic romance.”

I doubt anyone who’s never read a single page of Jane Eyre will truly get what that description means. It’s also possible that anyone who ever DID read Jane Eyre might not get what he means by that until they see the movie with their own eyes.

Del Toro made Crimson Peak based on his love of horror, fairy tales and Gothic stories. He went at length describing the differences, according to himself, between these ‘genres’ and how he wanted to mix everything to create a world similar to those from the stories he loved.

“I like how similar fairytales and gothic tales are. There is in fact a fairy tale called Bluebeard’s Wives that is very similar to the tale of Crimson Peak. There is a gothic tale called Uncle Silas by Joseph Sheridan le Fanu that is comparable too.

Fairy tales, gothic tales and horror are three forms of literature that are very closely related, but they’re not the same. You can have the most horrifying fairy tale and yet some elements define it as a fairy tale, mostly the whimsicality and the fact that the agency is supernatural in a non Judeo-Christian way. It’s elemental- a fairy, a dwarf, an ogre etc. Most of the time, the gothic tale involves romance. And by romance, I don’t just mean a love story, but a longing for a past that is very poetic. Horror always has elements that are different from the other two.

My inspiration was thinking, ‘Can I make a movie that is a mixture of all these things that I love?’”

A lot of titles were mentioned in the press when he taled about Crimson Peak. Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier (the Hitchcock film version is one of his favorites’) and Wuthering Heights came up a few times, as well as Jane Eyre and Uncle Silas. He also mentioned paintings by Caspar David Friedrich and John Atkinson Grimshaw, as well as ‘Deborah Kerr’s dress from The Innocents‘. If you know what these are, and can imagine them being mixed together with ghastly looking creatures that haunt the corridors at night, then you’ve pretty much managed to picture Crimson Peak inside your head. Continue reading

The Mad Shall Inherit

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n the craziness that’s my job lately, I almost forgot to write about my wonderful experience last March interviewing a great filmmaker from Australia whose movie is out in cinemas this summer, George Miller.

It began with an offer for a phone interview earlier this year. The studio emailed us and asked if we were interested in talking to George Miller about Mad Max: Fury Road. After we said yes and filled out the appropriate paperwork (WB likes to make us fill out forms and stuff) we waited for almost two months to hear about the confirmation. It was in end of February/early March that we heard back from them, who said that yes, we got a slot with Mr. Miller at the end of March (27th to be exact) at 8 AM.

8 AM, Sydney time. I had to wake up at 2 AM in order to get ready for the interview at 4 AM my time because we’re 4 hours behind Sydney. But other than this time zone shenanigan, I was fine waking up at 2 and I was strangely excited about the interview.

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Hannibal Season 3: The Tooth Fairy is Coming

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My fangirly heart was beating very hard today as I read Empire magazine’s interview with Hannibal‘s showrunner Bryan Fuller and stars Mads Mikkelsen and Hugh Dancy. The interview itself reveals nothing completely new – they even talked about King Arthur… again – but it also contains a mention of Richard Armitage and his character, Francis Dolarhyde, a.k.a. the Tooth Fairy. Which is why the upcoming third season of Hannibal has become my most anticipated show in the summer.

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The Week of the Five Finales

Saying goodbye to the best of television… for now!

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Three months ago I never though I would arrive at this point: the week where five of the TV shows that I’m following will have their season finale… Broadchurch. Sleepy Hollow. Marvel’s Agent Carter. How to Get Away with Murder. They are all ending and will soon be leaving me with the biggest post-dramatic withdrawal syndrome ever.

(But I wonder why did they all have to end in the same week. I’m convinced the TV gods are punishing me.)

SPOILER ALERT: This entry contains spoiler of the finales of every show reviewed. Please proceed with caution.

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The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies – Reaction Post

THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG

SPOILER WARNING. If you have not watched The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies, please proceed with caution as this entry contains spoilers, or do not proceed to read at all until you’ve watched it.

I watched The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies today (at a press screening at 9 in the morning. In a cinema out of town. Because they made us. Trust me, I only wake up at 6 o’clock for Peter Jackson.) And here is my ‘reaction post’, which is a fancy phrase to say ‘notes about the movie that are not turned into a review yet.’

Again, the spoiler warning applies. I do not want to be responsible anyone getting spoiled.

If you have no watched the film, the next line is the start of Too Much Information for you.

(And if you scroll all the way down to listen to the sound bites, Richard Armitage’s sound bite may contain spoilers. Martin Freeman’s should be spoiler-free.)

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The Method: Richard Armitage Talk About Disagreeing with Thorin and Never Getting Sick of Him

The last two sound bites I have (for now) come from Richard Armitage, who managed – with his wonderful demeanor and professionalism – to make a fan out of All Film’s interviewer, Lauren. (And, really, none of the actors have his eloquence and diction. He’s orally, vocally perfect. I love transcribing him.) Listen for yourself.

The questions were: “Everyone reading the book probably identifies most with Bilbo. Were you the same? Did it surprise you that you ended up as Thorin instead?” and after he confessed to disagreeing with Thorin, the follow-up was “How do you play something that you disagree with?”

This sound bite was chosen purely for my own pleasure: to hear him sound exasperatedly amused at the question “Did you ever get fed up with it, playing the same character in the same universe?” Was he ever going to say yes? I doubt it. But I was amused by the tone of his voice when he answered it.

That is all for now. Don’t forget to listen to the previous sound bites:
+ Martin Freeman and Richard Armitage talk about Thorin and Bilbo’s relationship
+ Martin Freeman talks about his theater audience
+ Orlando Bloom talks about Elves, Dwarves and that ‘love triangle’

They are available on Soundcloud. Please visit/listen/like/add to playlist. That would be lovely – thank you!

These interviews are all included in All Film #60: All Hobbit Edition. (Available for order, even internationally.)

Transcripts to Richard Armitage’s interview will be posted in this blog next week.

This is not ‘the last goodbye’ to these sound bites. Now that I have a Soundcloud account, might as well upload others in the future. The only thing I need to find time for is to edit them… but I hope these sound bites have been enjoyable and illuminating and able to provide some excitement at this final chapter of Peter Jackson’s Middle-earth saga.

A Unique Position: Orlando Bloom on Legolas’ Ongoing Journey in Middle-earth

Legolas & Tauriel

Legolas & Tauriel

When All Film met up with Orlando Bloom and the other cast members of The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies in London a few months ago, we couldn’t help but sneak in one important question to the actor we’ve affectionately referred to as ‘Orly’: tell us more about the Elves and Dwarves.

The question is not without basis. We are quite delighted when we saw that scene The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug where Bloom’s Legolas called his future companion Gimli “a goblin mutant” to Gimli’s father’s face. Not only was it an amusing homage to their amazing friendship in Lord Of The Rings trilogy, but it was also apparently a setup for another blossoming Elf-Dwarf friendship between Legolas’ friend Tauriel (Evangeline Lilly) and the dwarf Kili (Aidan Turner). We wouldn’t go so far as to call it a love triangle but we know there are a few out there who call it exactly that.

So rather than speculate, why not ask Bloom directly what he thought about the relationship? And the actor responded spectacularly.

“It’s a good question, isn’t it? You tell me,” he responded to All Film and admitted,  “I think that calling it a love triangle is a little extreme.”

Fair enough, but Bloom also explained that Tauriel was Legolas’ kin and so he was protective of her. “You can probably read all sorts of things into all of that,” he acquiesced.

More importantly, Bloom continued, the relationship between Legolas and Tauriel, as well as Tauriel and Kili, was “an interesting and clever element to bring to that story, because I think you’ll see it as it comes to its end in this movie, you kind of get to see through Legolas’s eyes: the history of the Elves, and the Dwarves and Men, and in a way you understand why he is the elf that goes into The Lord of The Rings. Through what he has experienced in the Hobbit, he becomes that character. In this instance, he is still experiencing all that stuff, so it’s quite fun to play with that.”

While Bloom didn’t report any sort of off screen shenanigans between Elf actors and Dwarf actors on the set of The Hobbit, we’re pretty sure there was still a bit of mischief that happened during the course of filming. Of course we’d prefer it if all the bitter rivalries and fighting between these two races happened solely on screen on Peter Jackson’s last The Hobbit film.

This interview can be read in full in All Film #60. For more info, read here.